2017 SEASON

   
GETTY VILLA THEATER LAB SERIES PRESENTS ONE OF
THE EARLIEST KNOWN REFUGEES STORIES AND
OLDEST SURVIVING DRAMA FROM ANCIENT GREECE
    

THE SUPPLIANT WOMEN
by Aeschylus

Directed by
Michael Arabian

Translated by
George Theodoridis    

Produced by
Michael Arabian and John Perrin Flynn
    

BUY TICKETS
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
November18th:
​bled for...
December 4th:
Rant & Rave
November17th:
​The Suppliant Women
Parking Info
Subscribe to our
e-newsletter
Fundraiser:
Gone Rogue!
   
Friday, November 17, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 3:00

and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.
     
All performances of The Suppliant Women take place in the Auditorium at the Getty Villa, located at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272.

Tickets are $7 and can be reserved by calling
310-440-7300

or at

http://www.getty.edu/museum/programs/performances/theater_lab.html.
 
    
   
Aeschylus's The Suppliant Women, one of the oldest surviving dramas from ancient Greece, is the first play and only surviving full text of the lost Danaid Tetralogy. The tetralogy was inspired by the myth of Io and her two warring sons, Aegyptus and Danaos. After Aegyptus usurps Danaos's throne, the 50 sons of Aegyptus seek to possess the 50 daughters of Danaos by forced marriage. Danaos and his daughters reject the compulsory unions and flee to Argos for sanctuary, pursued by the Egyptians.
 
Translated by renowned writer and translator George Theodoridis, The Suppliant Women is one of Aeschylus's most poetic pieces and one of the earliest known stories of refugees. In this timely production at the Villa, Argos is modern Greece and the daughters, wearing life jackets and arriving on overcrowded boats, are Syrian refugees. This ancient play has neither hero, nor downfall, nor even tragic conclusion. Instead, the play's themes, still pertinent today, explore human rights, the continuing oppression of women, and societal reactions to refugees.
    

Reviews